Malaysia and China look to boost two-way trade

A diplomatic approach towards regional issues has strengthened Malaysia’s efforts to boost trade and investment ties with China, setting the scene for the two countries to roll out an ambitious programme of increased financial cooperation.

Last October, China and Malaysia agreed to raise bilateral ties to a “comprehensive strategic partnership”, with a focus on boosting military cooperation and increasing two-way trade almost three-fold to $160bn by 2017.

Deputy Minister of International Trade and Industry, Datuk Lee Chee Leong, announced in July that Malaysia’s exports to China for the year had already reached $106bn (RM341bn). He added that Malaysian exports currently accounted for 23.9% of China’s total trade with Asean countries.

Although Malaysia is China’s largest Asean trading partner, more can still be done to help the dynamic reach its full potential say Malaysian business groups in particular.

Building ties

The strengthening of bilateral ties comes against a backdrop of growing tension between Beijing and key Southeast Asian nations over maritime disputes in the South China Sea.

While the sovereignty issues simmer, however, diplomatic relations between China and Malaysia remain positive, as US state department envoy John Finkbeiner pointed out in a 2013 study. “Malaysia appears to pursue a non-confrontational approach in the sovereignty dispute, which differs markedly compared to Vietnam and the Philippines,” he wrote. “The first pillar regards Malaysia’s firm commitment to increase its trade and investment ties with the world’s most dynamic economy [China] in order to hedge its other strong economic ties, with the US in particular.”

However Malaysia’s approach has contributed to a growing imbalance in bilateral cross flows between the two countries. Malaysia has channelled almost $7bn of investment into China, but received just $1bn from the Asian giant in return.

Last year, the National Chamber of Commerce and Industry Malaysia (NCCIM) called on the government to intervene by adopting a more pro-active stance in correcting the current investment imbalance, which falls in China’s favour.

The Chinese ambassador to Malaysia, Huang Huikang, has given a reassurance that efforts to address the imbalance are making headway. Chinese interest in Kuantan Industrial Park is expected to help take the country’s investment in Malaysia past the $2bn (RM6.42bn) mark this year, he said. The ambassador added that Beijing aimed to encourage more of its companies to increase their investments in Malaysia.

While Malaysian exports to China remain dominated by agricultural products, such as palm oil, Chinese firms are strengthening their presence in the technological sector as well as in cultural initiatives such as the $91.47m Impression Melaka venture, a live theatre project, which is being rolled out jointly by Malaysia’s PTS Impression Sdn Bhd and China Impression Wonders Art Development Co. Ltd in Malacca.

A readiness to do business in the Chinese currency renminbi (RMB) is giving Malaysia’s exporters an added advantage, according to a HSBC Commercial Banking survey released in July.

“The settlement of goods and services in RMB will remove the foreign exchange risk exposure from the Chinese companies and hence allow them to reduce their cost,” HSBC Bank Malaysia Bhd head of global trade and receivable finance, Vincent Sugianto, said in a statement. “Ability to trade in RMB also allows Malaysian companies to tap into a wider customer base in China which currently does not have access to foreign currency trades.”

Containing shocks

Despite Malaysia’s healthy trade relations with China, however, external factors risk weighing on bilateral ties.

The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines’ Flight MH370 in March put a strain on the relationship between the two countries, sparking a 19% drop in visitors from China for the month of April year-on-year (y-o-y), although these figures have since rallied. The casualties included 153 passengers who were Chinese nationals.

“That the Chinese press has begun to soften its tone towards Malaysia’s government [over the MH370 search] reflects the view that China is better off swallowing a tough pill than taking any action that could provide the US with a major strategic advantage at Beijing’s expense,” the South China Morning Post said.

Follow Oxford Business Group on Facebook, Google+ and Twitter for all the latest Economic News Updates. Or register to receive updates via email.

Source:

Malaysia and China look to boost two-way trade

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Malaysia focusing on qualitative growth rather than quantitative easing

With the US Federal Reserve set to reduce its bond buying activities as of January 2014, there has been growing speculation as to how great an impact the tapering will have on emerging markets, including Malaysia. While some economies dependent on short-term capital inflows, such as Turkey or Brazil, are likely to face challenges, Malaysia is increasingly seen as more capable of coping with the reversal of the US bond policy.

In mid-December, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) governor, Zeti Akhtar Aziz, said that the central bank was well positioned to manage and intermediate any volatility resulting from the tapering of quantitative easing, and had been preparing for the gradual reduction in the US bond buying scheme.

“Progressive liberalisation has resulted in two-way flows that will help towards stabilising the markets, and BNM will be there to ensure orderly market conditions,” Zeti said.

While there will likely be some negative economic effects, there are also potential advantages to be had from the ending of US quantitative easing, the BNM head said.

“We have to take the tapering as an eventuality and it is a sign that the US economy has improved and this would be positive for the rest of the world,” she said. “However, as recipients of funds, we would see more volatility in our financial markets.”

Zeti noted she expects local institutional investors such as pension funds and insurance companies to step up and play an increasing role in the markets as overseas funds are withdrawn.

Another individual to remain confident in the economy’s outlook in the face of quantitative easing is Edward Iskandar Toh, chief investment officer of fixed income for Areca Capital, a Malaysia-based fund management company. In an interview with the local media January 13, Toh explained that the domestic market had been factoring in the advent of tapering for the past six months.

Growth set to outweigh tapering downside

Even with the Federal Reserve’s tapering as a cloud on the horizon, the Malaysian economy is expected to sustain momentum in 2014, with analysts predicting expansion of 5% or more. According to a report issued by Standard Chartered Bank on January 9, improved foreign trade and continued strong domestic demand will underpin growth, suggesting the economy would be able to ride out the impact of the Fed’s tapering.

Indications that Malaysia could likely experience a soft landing when the Fed eases its stimulus programme came in early January, with the release of the latest current account figures. November saw the highest trade surplus in almost two years, rising from October’s $2.51bn to $2.96bn.

Following the release of the trade data on January 8, Rahul Bajoria, an analyst with Barclays, said the ongoing growth in trade “boded well for overall economic performance”. Should the economy continue to expand, it could attract both longer-term foreign direct investment as well as more mobile overseas capital.

A further show of confidence came from ratings agency Moody’s, which in mid-November upgraded its outlook for Malaysia’s government bonds from stable to positive, while reaffirming both bond and issuer ratings at A3. One of the factors influencing Moody’s decision to revise its outlook was what the agency described as Malaysia’s “continued macroeconomic stability in the face of external headwinds”.

Some impact inevitable

Though Zeti and others are confident that the Malaysian economy can successfully weather the ending of quantitative easing, the tapering process is likely to cause ripples, as has already been seen in mid-2013, when speculation first began regarding the Fed’s plans to cut its stimulus programme. Over the course of 2013, the ringgit lost nearly 7% of its value, its worst performance since the Asian economic crisis of 1997, while the cost of government borrowing also edged up as the focus of investor interest shifted towards the US.

However, in comparative terms, Malaysia has fared quite well – the value of Indonesia’s rupiah, for example, fell by around 20% in 2013. The worst of the impact has probably occurred, and a rejuvenated US economy could boost demand for Malaysian exports, part of the upside referenced by BNM governor Zeti. With its own economy set to expand solidly, and some of its main external trading partners on the road to recovery, Malaysia will likely experience ripples, rather than waves, as the Federal Reserve shifts down its bond-buying programme.

Follow Oxford Business Group on Facebook, Google+ and Twitter for all the latest Economic News Updates. Or register to receive updates via email.

Originally posted here - 

Malaysia focusing on qualitative growth rather than quantitative easing

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Malaysia’s EU trade negotiations in spotlight

With the end of an agreement granting Malaysia preferential access to the EU market looming, all eyes are on ongoing negotiations between Kuala Lumpur and Brussels aimed at securing a replacement free trade pact.

Malaysia currently benefits from the EU’s generalised system of preferences (GSP) scheme, which provides developing countries with generous tariff reductions on exports. However, the World Bank’s decision to award the South-east Asian state upper-middle-income-nation status will end its eligibility for the lower levies from January 2014.

While EU representatives are confident that a new free trade agreement (FTA) will deepen economic integration between its member states and Malaysia, local business representatives have questioned whether they can remain competitive once the lower tariffs are withdrawn.

Strong bilateral trade

The EU is a major importer of Malaysia’s goods. Figures show its members purchased 13%, or 2.22m tonnes, of the country’s palm oil exports in 2012, and spend more than $1.3bn each year on Malaysian timber. On October 22, the Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation (MATRADE) said it expected total bilateral trade to reach RM120bn ($38.2bn) in 2013. Results so far this year suggest this is an attainable goal, with exports to the EU for the first eight months amounting to RM41bn ($13bn), while imports stood at RM45bn ($14bn).

Susila Devi, the senior director of MATRADE’s Strategic Planning Division, told reporters that Europe offered Malaysia a broad range of business and investment opportunities across the industries. “It also includes information communication technology, chemicals, automotives, renewable energy, logistics, agro food processing, pharmaceuticals and financial services,” she commented.

FTA negotiations

Business leaders, however, have highlighted the significant impact that the end of GSP status is set to have on trade and investment.

The GSP scheme provides duty reductions of up to 66% on sales to the EU. Malaysia’s exports to Europe under the initiative were valued at RM13.5bn ($4.3bn) in 2011, or 17% of its overseas shipments, according to a report published by the EdgeMalaysia in April.

Tan Sri Lee Oi Hian, CEO of Kuala Lumpur Kepong, a Malaysia conglomerate with interests in the palm oil industry, warned in March that without the GSP, the tax rate on some Malaysian oleochemicals heading for the EU would be between 4% and 6%. “We will just not be competitive,” he said at a Global Malaysia Series workshop.

Lee, together with other business leaders, said the impending withdrawal of the GSP scheme heightened the need for the government to secure an FTA with Europe. The loss of the GSP could be “another nail in the coffin” for the local palm oil industry, he said.

The EU and Malaysia first entered into discussions on a FTA in late 2010, with the next round of negotiations scheduled for the fourth quarter of this year. The ambassador and head of the EU delegation to Malaysia, Luc Vandebon, told Bernama in June that if the next round of talks is held before the end of 2013, then “it should be possible to conclude negotiations in late 2014/early 2015”.

The EU delegation’s former ambassador to Malaysia, Vincent Piket, said last year that an FTA would boost the country’s GDP by 8% by 2020.

“The conclusion of the FTA would be a landmark step in the fostering of bilateral trade between the two partners and deepen economic integration,” he said.

Looking long term

FTA supporters say a deal will, over time, increase market access for goods and services, facilitate trade and investment flows, enable mutual recognition of standards and qualifications, and increase joint capacity-building programmes.

However, not all Malaysians feel that an EU trade pact, at least in its current proposed form, is the best path for securing long-term economic growth.

In a report published in late 2012 by the IFRI Centre for Asian Studies, part of a French think tank, author Tham Siew Yean noted that the proposed FTA was in conflict with key interests of Malaysia. Tham raised particular concerns about the impact of intellectual property rules on the pharmaceutical sector.

“A small trading economy such as Malaysia’s is keen to lock in its market access to other countries. … [But] Malaysia’s focus has always been in the ASEAN as well as the wider East Asian market. In this scenario, ASEAN agreements, including Malaysia’s commitments in extra-ASEAN-wide agreements, will hold more weight than an agreement with the EU,” he wrote.

Concerns have been raised that with regional competitors also vying for the EU market, Malaysia could be tempted to negotiate a deal with the union from a position of weakness or sign an agreement lacking transparency. Many Malaysians, it would seem, are keen to avoid landing an unbalanced deal that fails to dovetail with the country’s broader vision for growth.

Follow Oxford Business Group on Facebook, Google+ and Twitter for all the latest Economic News Updates. Or register to receive updates via email.

View article:

Malaysia’s EU trade negotiations in spotlight

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Malaysia: Keeping the economy running

The central bank in Malaysia is keeping an eye on macroeconomic stability at a time when a cooling external environment is putting pressure on growth. While international factors are starting to affect overall economic performance, domestic demand remains relatively robust, supported by consumer spending and public investments.

On July 11, the Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), the central bank, announced it would be maintaining its key policy rate on hold for the 13th consecutive month. The bank kept its benchmark overnight rate at 3%, as analysts surveyed by Bloomberg had expected.

The BNM decision balanced concerns of both a slowdown in the economy and rising personal debt. Malaysia’s year-on-year GDP growth has dropped below 5% for the first time in seven quarters, while household borrowing has been increasing at an annual average 12% for five years.

In a statement, the bank noted that slow global growth had begun to act as a drag on the Malaysian economy, as in other emerging markets, despite healthy domestic demand. Domestic consumption has helped Malaysia and many of its neighbours weather the economic turbulence of recent years, with the rebalancing of the economy helping reduce dependence on exports, which have proved susceptible to slowdowns in Europe and the US.

“For the Malaysian economy, domestic demand has continued to support growth amid the continued moderation in external demand,” the bank said. “The sustained weakness in the external sector may, however, affect the overall growth momentum.”

Even so, the bank retains a positive outlook. It expects private consumption to stay steady, led by income growth and a stable labour market, and capital investment both from domestic-oriented industries and government infrastructure projects to help maintain economic momentum. Malaysia is in the process of rolling out the government’s Economic Transformation Programme (ETP), a wide-ranging package of projects, including infrastructure schemes, designed to boost productivity and increase the private sector’s ability to drive growth.

The BNM is also comfortable with Malaysia’s inflation outlook. Inflation averaged 1.6% in the first five months of the year –low given the rate of economic growth. And while the central bank expects the rate to pick up in the second half of the year, it does not foresee inflation becoming a serious risk factor.

Despite low inflation and slowing growth, the BNM avoided cutting rates, keeping a wary eye on rising debt in an economic climate that has become more volatile in recent months. Malaysia’s experience in the 1997 Asian financial crisis makes policy-makers particularly aware of the need for financial and macroeconomic stability.

In early July, the BNM tightened regulations on lending, cutting the maximum repayment terms on personal loans to 10 years and property loans to 35 years, down from 25 year and 45 years, respectively. Some analysts quoted in the international press suggest that the bank may become more hawkish on interest rates as well towards the end of the year, if growth remains resilient.

Following a period of strong capital flows to emerging markets, there has been a cooling off recently in the wake of signs from the US Federal Reserve that it would not push forward its quantitative easing (QE) policy. QE, a strategy of stimulating the economy through expansion of the monetary base, had boosted inflows to emerging markets as investors sought higher returns than those available in developed economies. Malaysia, with its macroeconomic and political stability and stable growth rate, proved particularly attractive: by February, foreigners held almost half the country’s outstanding sovereign debt.

With QE now likely to be phased out and signs of a slowdown in major emerging markets such as China (a key export market for Malaysia), investor appetite for Malaysian assets are expected to abate. However compared to advanced economies Malaysia along with the rest of South East Asia will continue to enjoy a higher rate of growth thanks to relatively stable domestic demand and investment.

Link to original:

Malaysia: Keeping the economy running

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Malaysia: Religious tourism boost

Having been ranked the friendliest country for Muslim holidaymakers for the third year running, Malaysia has confirmed its position as a premier halal tourism destination. However, its position – and the revenue that comes with it – could be challenged by regional rivals seeking to cash in on the lucrative market.

The tourism sector is already a major contributor to the Malaysian economy, directly generating $21.4bn in 2012, the equivalent of 7% GDP, according to the latest report on the global industry’s economic impact, issued by the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC). The council’s report for 2013, released at the end of February, said tourism provided direct employment to more than 800,000 Malaysians, some 6.5% of the active workforce.

However, when indirect factors – such as state spending on tourism-related infrastructure and support, the supply and purchase of goods and services, transport, information technology and utilities – are taken into consideration, tourism’s total contribution to the economy came to $48bn, or 15.6% of GDP, and accounted for 1.7m jobs, 13.6% of the total.

The WTTC has also forecast Malaysia will continue to build on its achievements, with total tourism revenues expected to reach $81.5bn by 2023 on the back of a sharp increase in arrival numbers over the coming decade, as the number of visitors is projected to rise from 27m in 2013 to 45m in 10 years.

According to Jamil Bidin, CEO of local firm Halal Industry Development Corporation (HDC), Malaysia has made itself into a leading destination for visitors from the Middle East by making its halal brand what he called, “a seal of guarantee for consumers”. “If you want to encourage Muslim tourists to come to your country, halal-certified products and services are required,” Bidin told reporters at a halal trade fair in Kuala Lumpur in early April.

The international halal tourism trade is estimated to be worth more than $125bn per year, some 12.3% of the global outbound tourism market. This figure is set to rise by an estimated 4.8% annually through to 2020 – well above the forecast 3.8% global average – as disposable incomes in many Asian and Middle Eastern countries increase. Malaysia has already positioned itself to take a significant slice of the existing and future trade, being ranked first for the past three years in an international survey for being halal tourism friendly.

The annual market assessment, based on a number of factors, including the availability of halal food, prayer facilities, and halal-friendly accommodation, was carried out by Singapore-based consultancy and research firm Crescentrating. According to Fazal Bahardeen, CEO of the firm, the survey was conducted from the point of view of the traveller, meaning that it measured the ease of access by Muslim tourists rather than locals to halal food and services, with Malaysia scoring well across the board.

Malaysia’s continued strong showing was largely due to the fact that authorities have been focusing on the market for a number of years, he said. “Malaysia remains the top destination for Muslim holidaymakers,” said Fazal. “It is still the best place to enjoy your holiday and at the same time be completely worry-free when it comes to finding halal food and prayer places almost everywhere.”

Malaysia also benefits from being within a single flight of much of the world’s 1.7bn Muslims, as it has direct links to the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent and Asia.

While Malaysia may head the Crescentrating rankings, it is likely to face increasing competition from regional rivals in the years to come. The survey found that Indonesia was lagging when it came to catering for halal tourism, though Jakarta has announced it will launch a multi-faceted programme in June that aims to better Indonesia’s tourism sector to perform in the sharia-compliant segment of the global market. Singapore and Thailand also have strong market potential and hope to begin competing with Malaysia.

Under the government’s Tourism Transformation Plan 2020, launched in 2010, Malaysia is aiming to attract 36m overseas visitors by the end of the decade, a target it seems to be well on track to achieving, having seen arrivals hit a record 25m in 2012, some 40% up on the 2005 total. Similar progress over the next seven years will put Kuala Lumpur’s goal well within reach and on the road to the 45m the WTTC has forecast for 2023.

The Ministry of Tourism estimates that almost one-quarter of inbound visitors come from Muslim countries, which makes the need to maintain the flow of new services and facilities for this market essential to further growth and development of the sector, as well as to ensure it stays ahead of regional and international rivals.

Excerpt from:  

Malaysia: Religious tourism boost

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Malaysia: Easing business practices

Malaysia has been one of the big movers in the latest World Bank survey on the ease of doing business, moving up six rungs on the international ladder to be ranked 12th overall. However, making it easier to obtain construction permits and start a business, two areas signalled out for improvement, will help the country achieve its goal of breaking into the top 10.

The annual study aims to provide an objective measure of business regulations for local firms and give an indication of the progress in facilitating private sector development. In the 2013 edition, released on October 23, Malaysia further consolidated its reputation for economic reform, building on its performance in 2011 when it moved from 23rd to 18th place. The improvement in the rankings puts Malaysia behind only Singapore, Hong Kong and South Korea in Asia, and ahead of regional heavyweights Japan and China.

The survey, titled “Doing Business 2013”, saw Malaysia improve its competitiveness in a number of areas, including registering property and trading across borders. The country continues to be ranked first globally in terms of gaining access to credit, and it also won accolades for the judicial network protecting investors, where it came in fourth among the 185 countries surveyed.

Recognition of the strong performance will help to further promote development and investment, said Annette Dixon, the country director for Malaysia at the World Bank. “This will help the private sector drive growth, particularly if Malaysia can build on its success by continuing to tackle long-term challenges, such as improving the quality of education,” Dixon said in a statement accompanying the release of the report.

According to Yeah Kim Leng, the group chief economist at RAM Holdings, a financial research firm, the improved business environment will help maintain Malaysia’s high profile as a prime investment destination. “It enhances business sentiment and confidence,” he said on October 24. “If the improvement is sustained, what we will likely see is an increase in business dynamism and a higher level of business activity.”

Mustapa Mohamed, the minister of international trade and industry, said that the findings of the study confirmed Malaysia’s competitiveness as an economy, and reflected the successful implementation by the government to improve the business environment, making it conducive for sustained economic growth. The next step, according to the minister, is putting in place further reforms that should move Malaysia even higher up the rankings. He did acknowledge, however, that the task would be a difficult one, given the competitive nature of the global economy.

“Our objective is to achieve a top-10 position in the World Bank’s rankings. Getting there will strengthen our position as a destination of choice for local and foreign investors,” Mustapa said. “This is with new competitors constantly emerging and economic uncertainties globally. It is apparent that more needs to be done in the shortest time possible if we are to stay ahead.”

While the study very much stressed the positives, it also detailed a few areas of improvement that will have to be dealt with before Malaysia can break into the higher rankings. Despite the government making it easier to obtain construction permits, it still placed only 96th overall in this category. There is also room for improvement in the ease of starting a business, in which was Malaysia ranked 54th this year.

Two state agencies, the Special Taskforce to Facilitate Business (Pemudah) and the Performance Management Delivery Unit (Pemandu), have been tasked with addressing these issues, as well as developing strategies to promote best bureaucratic and administrative practices, with Pemudah in particular working closely with the private sector to cut red tape.

In an opinion piece carried by The Malay Mail on October 26, Ramon Navaratnam, the chairman of the Centre of Public Policy Studies, an independent think tank within the Asian Strategy and Leadership Institute, said the World Bank study did not cover issues such as public services or the non-business sectors of society. Improvements in the provision of services in areas such as health, education and social welfare also need to be addressed when considering the state of the economy.

“The best way forward is for the public sector to adopt further best practices, forced by global competition to perform more competitively all the time or face the prospects of losing its profits and business opportunities for growth,” he said.

Source article:  

Malaysia: Easing business practices

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Malaysia: Islamic finance pensions

Moves to liberalise Malaysia’s pensions market are expected to galvanise the Islamic finance market, already a key segment of the country’s economy, though greater regulatory oversight will be needed to bolster investor confidence in the sector.

On July 23, the international press reported that Malaysia was introducing “sweeping reforms” to its pension system. The changes introduce a new, voluntary Private Retirement Scheme (PRS) to run alongside the existing Employees Provident Fund (EPF). The PRS will allow Malaysians to purchase a wide variety of products from private fund management firms, making it easier for them to focus on Islamic investment. Currently, the EPF collects pension contributions and invests the cash; contributors can place up to 20% in a single mutual fund.

By facilitating investment in private products by individuals, the reforms are expected to kick-start the growth of Malaysia’s small private pensions sector, which the government now expects to be worth RM73bn ($22.92bn) by 2020. Though some think the prediction is rather optimistic, most agree that there is a lot of potential for growth given the regulatory changes, growing disposable incomes and a rising culture of saving for the future.

Officials – and the structure of the new regulations – make it clear that increasing investment in Islamic products is one of the aims of the changes. “The PRS will contribute to the growth of Islamic fund products,” Zakie Ahmad Shariff, a board member of the Private Pension Administrator (newly founded to oversee the PRS funds) and CEO of the Federation of Investment Managers Malaysia, told international press. Analysts agreed that those investing in the new system would gain from sharia-compliant offerings in particular.

Of the first 30 products offered through the PRS, only six will be Islamic, with the expectation that there will be more to come. The eight existing PRS providers ¬– all of which have sharia-compliant arms – can offer between three and seven conventional products through the system, but can provide up to 10 products if they offer Islamic schemes as well.

As the domestic market grows in new segments, Malaysia continues to cement its position as one of the world’s leading sharia-compliant sectors. It is particularly strong in sukuk (Islamic bonds), which accounted for 68.7% of the $84.4bn issued globally last year and 71% of the $43.5bn launched in the first quarter of 2012 (a 55% increase on 2011’s first quarter).

In July, Axiata, Malaysia’s leading mobile telephone operator, announced it was looking to raise up to $1.5bn in sukuk issues to tap low-cost long-term funds and increase its capital efficiency. It will be the first Asian telecoms firm to issue multiple currency sukuk, according to the company. The launch was “strategic” and targeted at investors in the region, as well as the Middle East and Europe, and officials said the move would help strengthen Malaysia’s position as a global sukuk leader.

The private sector and government bodies are likely to provide further issuances in the near future as Malaysia rolls out its ambitious Economic Transformation Programme, which envisages large investments in infrastructure and services and aims to develop the economy to boost value added and strengthen value chains.

While Malaysia’s Islamic finance sector continues to be a world leader, the industry’s rise to global prominence is relatively new. As elsewhere in the world, growth has brought on regulatory challenges, and some parts of the industry lag behind others.

“Sharia-compliant trustee management needs to move forward,” Abdul Jalil Rasheed, the CEO of Aberdeen Asset Management, which moved into Islamic finance in Malaysia in 2009 and counts the EPF as its biggest customer, told OBG. “Asset management is still a very locally driven business in Malaysia. There are currently 16 licences in the market for Islamic asset management, not all of which are doing well.”

Rasheed suggests that “innovation needs to slow” so that Islamic finance can put down deeper regulatory roots and to prevent firms from over-extending themselves, adding that the market may still not be mature enough for sharia-compliant hedge funds to flourish.

As Deputy Finance Minister Datuk Awang Adek Hussin noted last year, greater cooperation among Islamic finance experts, religious scholars, government bodies and the private sector is needed to support and consolidate the industry. “Although Malaysia’s Islamic financial performance has shown encouraging development, we should not be complacent with our achievements thus far,” he said.

Visit site:

Malaysia: Islamic finance pensions

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , ,